Kindergarten Curriculum (E.GEP)

English Language Arts

 

Goals

Children develop their macro language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. They will have many opportunities to use and learn about language in meaningful ways with meaningful contexts. They will also learn about English and learn the language as children question and inquire about themselves, others, and their constructed and natural environments. However, whilst children in Pre-kindergarten and Kindergarten 1 are developing basic concepts of print, they are not expected to be proficient readers or writers of English print texts.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children in Pre-Kindergarten learn to comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address identity-exploring interests such as community-belonging as well as social responsibility and contribution. They will also compose and create various visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore and present thoughts, ideas, and experiences.
  • Children in Kindergarten 1 learn to view and interpret the basic message of visuals and objects in a variety of texts including models, photographs, dramas, dance creations, and videos. They will also use and construct symbols, pictures, and dramatizations to communicate feelings and ideas in a variety of ways.
  • Children in Kindergarten 2 learn to listen, comprehend, and respond, in order to gain meaning in oral texts. They will also use oral language to converse, engage in play time, express ideas, and share personal experiences.
  • Children in Kindergarten 3 learn to comprehend, retell, and respond to basic ideas in stories, poems, songs, and informational texts read to them. They will be able to create messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, and letters.
Phonics

Goals

Phonics in the Kindergarten curriculum has been designed to enable children to learn reading and writing abilities so that they are able to convey and construct meaning.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children recognize that printed symbols carry meaning.
  • Children understand that speech can be written.
  • Children understand that pictures extend and clarify the meaning of print.
  • Children use letter-like symbols frequently in combination with numbers, drawings and designs to convey meaning.
  • Children use letter-like formations at random.
  • Children show eagerness to dictate ideas for others to write down.
  • Children attempt first “messages” which are typically their own names.
  • Children realize there is a relationship between oral and written versions of words.
  • Children are able to spell, read and write short and long syllable words.
Chinese (Mandarin) Language Arts

Goals

Children, from Kindergarten 2, develop their macro language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. They will have many opportunities to use and learn about language in meaningful ways with meaningful contexts to use and learn about language as children question and inquire about themselves, others, and their constructed and natural environments. However, whilst children at Kindergarten 2 and Kindergarten 3 are developing basic concepts of print, they will not be expected to be proficient readers or writers of Chinese print texts.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children in Kindergarten 2 learn to comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts that address identity-exploring interests such as community-belonging as well as social responsibility and contribution. They will also compose and create various visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts that explore and present thoughts, ideas, and experiences.
  • Children in Kindergarten 2 learn to view and interpret the basic message of visuals and objects in a variety of texts including models, photographs, dramas, dance creations, and videos. They will also use and construct symbols, pictures, and dramatizations to communicate feelings and ideas in a variety of ways.
  • Children in Kindergarten 2 learn to listen, comprehend, and respond, in order to gain meaning in oral texts. They will also use oral language to converse, engage in play time, express ideas, and share personal experiences.
  • Children in Kindergarten 2 learn to comprehend, retell, and respond to basic ideas in stories, poems, songs, and informational texts read to them. They will be able to create messages using a combination of pictures, symbols, and letters.
Mathmatics

Goals

Children understand quantity, shape, and space in their environment. They require opportunities for reflection, exploration of patterns and relationships, sharing ideas and problems, and decision making. Opportunities, such as play and inquiry, for children to communicate through representing will be part of the learning experience.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children at Pre-kindergarten say the whole number sequence by starting from 0 to 10 and from 10 to 0.
  • Children at Pre-kindergarten recognize and name familiar arrangements of 1 to 5 objects, dots, or pictures.
  • Children at Pre-kindergarten relate a numerals (0 to 10), and their respective quantities.
  • Children at Pre-kindergarten represent the partitioning of whole numbers (1 to 10) concretely and pictorially.
  • Children at Pre-kindergarten compare quantities, 0 to 10, using one-to-one correspondence.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 to Kindergarten 3 say the whole number sequence by starting anywhere from 10 to 1000 and from 1000 to 10.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 to Kindergarten 3 recognize and name familiar arrangements of 10 to 50 objects, dots, or pictures.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 to Kindergarten 3 demonstrate an understanding of repeating patterns (two or three elements) by: identifying, reproducing, extending and creating.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 to Kindergarten 3 use direct comparison to compare two objects based on a single attribute, such as: length including height, mass, volume and capacity.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 to Kindergarten 3 sort 3-D objects using a single attribute.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 to Kindergarten 3 build and describe 3-D objects.
Science

Goals

Children must increasingly become engaged in the planning, development, and evaluation of their own learning activities in the areas of the environment, energy, objects and materials, and natural surroundings. In the process, children should have the opportunity to work collaboratively with others, to initiate investigations, to communicate findings, and to complete projects that demonstrate learning.

Scientific literacy will be achieved through inquiry as children explore, use their senses, and extend their capabilities through the use of technology. Children in Kindergarten should be able to explain what they were looking for, how they looked for it, what they found, and what the findings mean.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people in their local environment.
  • Children examine the effects of physical forces, magnetic forces, light energy, sound energy, and heat energy, on objects in their environment.
  • Children investigate observable characteristics of familiar objects and materials in their environment.
  • Children explore features of their natural surroundings (soil, water, landforms, and weather conditions), including changes to those surroundings over time.
Social Studies

Goals

Children explore their relationships with people, the land, and their communities. Children will be given opportunities to develop their understanding of the diversity and uniqueness of individuals, in addition to the connections humans have to both their natural and constructed environments. Through classroom and community experiences, children will learn about interactions, rules, and responsibilities.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children demonstrate an understanding of similarities and differences among individuals in the classroom.
  • Children describe the diversity of groups represented in the classroom.
  • Children describe the spatial relationships among people, places, and environments.
  • Children explore examples of promises made through actions and words, and why it is important to keep promises.
  • Children analyze ways in which place and physical systems influence daily life.
  • Children understand and respect the agreed-upon rules of the classroom, playground, and school, and recognize that rules and expectations are designed to promote a state of safety, self-regulation, peace, balance, and harmony.
  • Children recognize situations in which disagreement may be part of living, studying, and working together, and that resolution may be an avenue to progress to a state of peace, balance, and harmony.
  • Children examine ways of managing tasks and resources in families and schools.
  • Children develop and demonstrate stewardship of the environment in daily actions, in an effort to promote balance and harmony.
Health Education

Goals

Children attain and maintain a healthy mind, body, and spirit through the education of the “whole child”. In Kindergarten Health Education, children acquire the understanding, skills, and confidence needed to practice such behaviors as establishing healthy relationships, following safety guidelines, asking big questions such as “Who am I?”, and demonstrating initial steps for developing basic health habits.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children develop basic habits to establish healthy relationships with self, others, and the environment; to establish behaviors that support safety of self and others (including safety at school and at home).
  • Children explore that who I am includes more than my physical self.
  • Children establish that being curious about health and well-being is important for developing healthy habits, establishing healthy relationships, supporting safety, and exploring “self”.
  • Children demonstrate, with guidance, initial steps for developing basic health habits, establishing healthy relationships, supporting safety, and exploring “self”.
Physical Education

Goals

Not only do children need to move, they need to understand the “how, what, where, and why;” therefore, they make direct connection to the three goals of Active Living, Skillful Movement, and Relationships.

Mainly connected to the Active Living goal:

Children understand and practice the basic habits for developing health-related fitness to support personal well-being. They will be able to recognize beneficial physical movement and the body signals that are a response to this movement and will participate in a variety of movement activities at a moderate to vigorous level as they begin to establish the habit for a life of participation in movement activities.

Skillful Movement goal:

Children should be expected to explore and practice a variety of skills, with specific attention to the skills identified in the outcomes. They are expected to perform some skills at the level referred to. Skillful Movement also includes expanding children’s awareness of what the body does, where the body moves, how the body performs the movement, and with whom or with what the body moves. These understandings are referred to as the movement variables. Kindergarten children will begin to explore the variables to support them in growing as skillful movers.

Relationships goal:

Children develop a foundation for safe, considerate, and responsible behaviour while participating in movement activities.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children participate in a variety of moderate to vigorous movement activities for short periods of time to increase heart and respiration rate, flexibility, muscular endurance, and muscular strength.
  • Children explore and practice ways to move the body through space.
  • Children explore and practice ways to move the body in personal space at a progressing-towards-control level of skill when: balancing, jumping and landing (on the spot).
  • Children explore and practice ways to send and receive objects at an exploration level when: throwing (rolling), catching (trapping, gathering) and kicking.
  • Children vary, with guidance, the movement of the body through changes in: space (personal space, general space, levels, directions, and pathways), effort (time and speed) and relationships (body parts and shapes).
  • Children explore and perform rhythmical movement to different auditory (beat of a drum, clapping, music) rhythms (quick, slow) using a variety of loco-motor movements including walking, running, balancing, jumping, galloping, hopping, and skipping skills.
  • Children use respectful behaviours and safe practices while participating in cooperative games and physical movement activities.
Art

Goals

Children learn to develop imagination, multiple literacy, critical and creative thinking abilities, and innovative problem-finding and problem-solving processes as well as physical training that can be applied in a variety of ways in their daily lives.

Expected Outcomes

  • Children at Pre-Kindergarten learn creative or productive skills through ideas expression by exploration of the elements of dance including: action, body, dynamics, relationships, space and movement of drawing such as tracing and coloring.
  • Children at Kindergarten 1 learn to explore a variety of drama strategies including: role, imaging, parallel play, journeys, meetings and movement of drawing such as tracing, coloring and painting.
  • Children at Kindergarten2 learn to create sound compositions exploring the elements of music including: repeating patterns, beat (clapping and stepping, and counting), response to fast or slow paces, high or low sounds, loud or soft sounds, sounds with distinct tone colors or timbres and movement of drawing such as coloring and painting.
  • Children at Kindergarten 3 learn to create art works that express their own observations and ideas about the world; respond to arts expressions verbally and non-verbally (movement or drawing), and, investigate arts expressions found in own homes and school community in relation to own lives.