Primary Curriculum (E.GEP)

English Language Arts

Goals

  1. To develop students’ abilities to view, listen to, read, comprehend, and respond to oral, print, and texts.
  2. To develop students’ abilities to speak and use other forms of representation for different purposes and audiences.
  3. To develop student’s abilities to assess and reflect on their language skills for future improvement.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Comprehend and respond to grade-level texts.
  • View and comprehend the explicit messages, feelings, and features.
  • Listen to and comprehend a variety of texts.
  • Read and comprehend grade-appropriate texts.
  • Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts.
  • Speak clearly and audibly about ideas, experiences, preferences, questions, and conclusions in a logical sequence.
  • Write and share stories and short texts about familiar events in a minimum of ten sentences.
  • Identify, with teacher guidance, what good viewers, listeners, readers, speakers, and writers do.
  • Set and monitor goals for more effective viewing, listening, reading, speaking, and writing experiences.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to:

  • Comprehend and respond to grade-level texts including visual, oral, written, and multimedia.
  • View and respond to grade-appropriate visual and multimedia texts including videos and cartoons.
  • Listen to and understand information, identify main ideas and supporting details, compare different ideas and points of view, and explain connections made between texts heard.
  • Read fluently and demonstrate comprehension of grade-appropriate fiction, script, poetry, and non-fiction from various cultures and countries, and explain reactions and connections to texts read.
  • Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts.
  • Communicate ideas and information pertaining to topics, problems, questions, or issues.
  • Speak to present ideas and information appropriately with others to share ideas and opinions.
  • Write to communicate ideas, information, and experiences pertaining to any topic.
  • Reflect on and assess their viewing, listening, reading, speaking and writing.
  • Set personal goals to view, listen, read, speak and write.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze and respond to grade-level texts including multimedia texts.
  • View and evaluate, critically, visual and multimedia texts.
  • Listen purposefully to a range of texts from a variety of cultural traditions to understand ideas.
  • Read and demonstrate comprehension contemporary and classical grade-appropriate fictions.
  • Read grade 6 appropriate texts to increase fluency (120-160 words count per minute).
  • Compose and create a range of visual, multimedia, oral, and written texts.
  • Demonstrate ways to communicate understanding and responses.
  • Speak to express and support ideas and information in formal and informal speaking situations.
  • Use a writing process to experiment with and produce multi-paragraph narratives.
  • Identify strengths in viewing, listening, reading, speaking, writing, and representing.
  • Set goals to enhance the development and improvement of the skills and strategies in viewing, listening, reading, speaking, writing, and other forms of representing and take steps to achieve goals.
Phonics

Goals

  1. To enable students in grade 1 and grade 2 to improve reading and writing abilities so that they are able to convey and construct meaning.

Expected Outcomes of grade 1 and grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize that printed symbols carry meaning.
  • Understand that speech can be written.
  • Understand that pictures extend and clarify the meaning of print.
  • Use letter-like symbols frequently in combination with numbers, drawings and designs to convey meaning.
  • Use letter-like formations at random.
  • Show eagerness to dictate ideas for others to write down.
  • Attempt first “messages” which are typically own names.
  • Realize there is a relationship between oral and written versions of words.
  • Be able to spell, read and write short and long syllable words.
Chinese (Mandarin) Language Arts

Goals

  1. To develop macro language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing for students from grade 1 to grade 6.

Expected Outcomes of grade 1 to grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Comprehend and respond to a variety of visual, oral, print, and multimedia texts.
  • View and interpret the basic message of visuals and objects in a variety of texts.
  • Listen, comprehend, and respond to gain meaning in oral texts.
  • Comprehend, retell, and respond to basic ideas in stories, poems, songs, and informational texts.
Mathmatics

Goals

  1. To enable students to apply mathematical reasoning processes, skills, and strategies to new situations and problems.
  2. To develop students’ understanding of the meaning of, relationships between, properties of, roles of, and representations of numbers and apply this understanding to new situations and problems.
  3. To develop students’ understanding of 2-D shapes and 3-D objects, and the relationships between geometrical shapes and objects and numbers, apply this understanding to new situations and problems.
  4. To develop students’ understanding of mathematics as a way of knowing the world that all humans are capable of with respect to their personal experiences and needs.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Say the number sequence, 0 to 100, both forwards and backwards.
  • Recognize, at a glance, and name familiar arrangements of 1 to 10 objects, dots, and pictures.
  • Represent and describe whole numbers to 20 concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Demonstrate, concretely, physically, and pictorially, how whole numbers can be represented.
  • Identify the number, up to 20, that is one more, two more, one less and two less than a given number.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of addition of numbers with answers to 20.
  • Describe and use mental mathematics strategies.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of repeating patterns (two to four elements).
  • Translate repeating patterns from one form of representation to another.
  • Describe equality as a balance and inequality as an imbalance, concretely, physically, pictorially (0 to 20).
  • Record equalities using the equal symbol.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of measurement as a process of comparing.
  • Sort 3-D objects and 2-D shapes using one attribute, and explain the sorting rule.
  • Replicate composite 2-D shapes and 3-D objects.
  • Compare 2-D shapes to parts of 3-D objects in the environment.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of:

  • Whole numbers to 1000.
  • Addition of whole numbers with answers to 1000.
  • Multiplication to 5 x 5 and the corresponding division statements.
  • Fractions concretely, pictorially, physically, and orally.
  • Increasing and decreasing patterns.
  • Equality by solving one-step addition and subtraction equations.
  • The passage of time.
  • Measuring mass in g and kg.
  • Linear measurement (cm and m).
  • 3-D objects by analyzing characteristics.
  • 2-D shapes (regular and irregular).
  • First-hand data using tally marks, charts, lists, bar graphs, and line plots.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Represent, compare, and describe whole numbers to 1,000,000.
  • Analyze models of, develop strategies for, and carry out multiplication of whole numbers.
  • Demonstrate, with and without concrete materials, an understanding of division (3-digit by 1-digit) and interpret remainders to solve problems.
  • Develop and apply personal strategies for estimation and computation including: front-end rounding, compensation and compatible numbers.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of fractions.
  • Demonstrate understanding of decimals to thousandths.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of decimals (limited to thousandths).
  • Represent, analyze, and apply patterns using mathematical language and notation.
  • Write, solve, and verify solutions of single-variable, one-step equations with whole number coefficients and whole number solutions.
  • Design and construct different rectangles given either perimeter or area, or both (whole numbers), and draw conclusions.
  • Demonstrate understanding of measuring length (mm).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of volume.
  • Demonstrate understanding of capacity by: describing the relationship between ml and l.
  • Describe and provide examples of edges and faces of 3-D objects, and sides of 2-D shapes that are: parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical and horizontal.
  • Identify and sort quadrilaterals, including: rectangles, squares, trapezoids, parallelograms and rhombuses according to their attributes.
  • Identify, create, and analyze single transformations of 2-D shapes (with and without the use of technology).
  • Differentiate between first-hand and second-hand data.
  • Construct and interpret double bar graphs to draw conclusions.
  • Describe, compare, predict, and test the likelihood of outcomes in probability situations.
Science

Goals

  1. To develop students an understanding of the nature of science and technology, their interrelationships, and their social and environmental contexts, including interrelationships between the natural and constructed world.
  2. To help students construct an understanding of concepts, principles, laws, and theories in life science, in physical science, in earth and space science, and in Indigenous Knowledge of nature; and then apply these understandings to interpret, integrate, and extend their knowledge.
  3. To develop students the skills required for scientific and technological inquiry, problem solving, and communicating; for working collaboratively; and for making informed decisions.
  4. To develop students’ attitudes that support the responsible acquisition and application of scientific, technological, and Indigenous knowledge to the mutual benefit of self, society, and the environment.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Differentiate between living things according to observable characteristics, including appearance and behaviour.
  • Analyze different ways in which plants, animals, and humans interact with various natural and constructed environments to meet their basic needs.
  • Investigate observable characteristics and uses of natural and constructed objects and materials in their environment.
  • Examine methods of altering and combining materials to create objects that meet student-specified criteria.
  • Investigate characteristics of the five traditional external senses: sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste in humans and animals.
  • Explore how humans and animals use their senses to interact with their environment.
  • Compare and represent daily and seasonal changes of natural phenomena through observing, measuring, sequencing, and recording.
  • Inquire into the ways in which plants, animals, and humans adapt to daily and seasonal changes by changing their appearance, behaviour, and/or location.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to:

  • Investigate the growth and development of plants, including the conditions necessary for germination.
  • Analyze the interdependence among plants, individuals, society, and the environment.
  • Investigate properties of materials and methods of joinery used in structures.
  • Assess the function and characteristics of strong, stable, and balanced natural and human-built structures.
  • Investigate the characteristics of contact (push, pull, and friction) and non-contact (magnetic and static electric) forces.
  • Assess effects of practical applications of magnetic and static electric forces on individuals and society.
  • Investigate the characteristics, including soil composition and ability to absorb water, of different types of soils in their environment.
  • Analyze the interdependence between soil and living things, including the importance of soil for individuals, society, and all components of the environment.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze personal and societal requirements for, and the impact of, maintaining a healthy human body.
  • Investigate the structure, function, and major organs of one or more human body systems such as the digestive, excretory, respiratory, circulatory, nervous, muscular, and skeletal systems.
  • Assess how multiple human body systems function together to enable people to move, grow, and react to stimuli.
  • Investigate the characteristics and physical properties of materials in solid, liquid, and gaseous states of matter.
  • Investigate how reversible and non-reversible changes, including changes of state, alter materials.
  • Assess how the production, use, and disposal of raw materials and manufactured products affect self, society, and the environment.
  • Analyze the effects of gravitational, magnetic, and mechanical forces, including friction, on the movement of objects.
  • Investigate characteristics of simple machines, including levers, wheels and axles, pulleys, inclined planes, screws, and wedges, for moving and lifting loads.
  • Assess how natural and man-made forces and simple machines affect individuals, society, and the environment.
  • Measure and represent local weather, including temperature, wind speed and direction, amount of sunlight, precipitation, relative humidity, and cloud cover.
  • Investigate local, national, and global weather conditions, including the role of air movement and solar energy transfer.
  • Analyze the impact of weather on society and the environment, including technologies that help humans address weather conditions.
Social Studies

Goals

To develop students to be able to:

  1. Examine the local, indigenous, and global interactions and interdependence of individuals, societies, cultures, and nations.
  2. Analyze the dynamic relationships of people with the land, environments, events, and ideas as they have affected the past, shape the present, and influence the future.
  3. Investigate the processes and structures of power and authority, and the implications for individuals, communities, and nations.
  4. Examine various worldviews about the use and distribution of resources and wealth in relation to the needs of individuals, communities, nations, and the natural environment, and contribute to sustainable development.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Describe the diversity of traditions, celebrations, or stories of individuals in the classroom and school.
  • Discuss cultural diversity in the family and classroom, including exploration of similarities and differences.
  • Assess ways in which relationships help to meet human needs.
  • Relate family events and stories of the recent or distant past to the student’s place in present day family life.
  • Describe kinship patterns of the past and present and describe according to traditional teachings.
  • Demonstrate awareness of humans’ reliance on the natural environment to meet needs, and how location affects families in meeting needs and wants.
  • Recognize globes and maps as representations of the surface of the Earth, and distinguish land and water masses on globes and maps.
  • Identify and represent the orientation in space (where) and time (when) of significant places and events in the lives of students.
  • Analyze actions and practices in the family, classroom, and on the playground that support peace and harmony, including rules and decision-making processes.
  • Analyze the causes of disharmony and ways of returning to harmony.
  • Describe the influence of physical, spiritual, emotional, and intellectual needs and wants on personal well-being.
  • Discuss ways in which work may be managed and distributed in families, schools, and groups.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze daily life in a diversity of communities.
  • Analyze the cultures and traditions in communities studied.
  • Illustrate examples of interdependence of communities.
  • Use various model representations of the Earth.
  • Assess the degree to which the geography and related environmental and climatic factors influence ways of living on and with the land.
  • Compare the beliefs of various communities around the world regarding living on and with the land.
  • Compare how decisions are made in the local community and communities studied.
  • Demonstrate awareness that divergent viewpoints may lead to conflict as part of group interactions, and assess various means of conflict resolution.
  • Make generalizations about the purpose and intent of documents that define the rights of children.
  • Appraise the ways communities meet their members’ needs and wants.
  • Analyze the creation and distribution of wealth in communities studied.
  • Evaluate the ways in which technologies have impacted daily life.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze the evolution of Cambodian culture.
  • Analyze the historic and contemporary relationship of people to land in Cambodia.
  • Assess the impact of the environment on the lives of people living in Cambodia.
  • Identify the European influence on pre-confederation Cambodian society.
  • Describe Cambodia’s economic situation.
  • Explain the importance of sustainable management of the environment to Cambodia’s future.
  • Hypothesize about economic changes that Cambodia may experience in the future.
Health Education

Goals

  1. To develop the students’ understanding, skills, and confidence necessary to take action to improve health.
  2. To help students’ make informed decisions based on health-related knowledge.
  3. To help students’ apply decisions that will improve personal health and/or the health of others.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Examine healthy behaviors and opportunities and begin to determine how these behaviours and opportunities may affect personal well-being.
  • Determine, with support, the importance of the brain, heart, and lungs and examine behaviours that keep these organs healthy.
  • Analyze, with support, feelings and behaviours that are important for nurturing healthy relationships at school.
  • Determine and practice safe pedestrian/street behaviours and examine related safety challenges in the community.
  • Explore the association between a healthy sense of “self” and one’s positive connection with others and the environment.
  • Examine initial steps (Stop, Think, Do) for making basic choices regarding healthy behaviours; healthy brain, heart, and lungs; healthy relationships; pedestrian/street safety; and a healthy sense of self.
  • Apply the steps of Stop, Think, and Do (with guidance) to develop healthy behaviours related to a healthy brain, heart, and lungs; healthy relationships; pedestrian/street safety; and a healthy sense of self.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to:

  • Determine the role of a variety of healthy foods and physical activity on the health and development of the mind, body, and immune system.
  • Examine the spiritual dimension of the “inner self” and determine the importance of nurturing it.
  • Determine how the misuse of helpful and the use of harmful substances (including tobacco) affect the health of self and others.
  • Understand what it means to contribute to the health of self, family and home.
  • Evaluate safe behaviors/practices to increase the safety of self and others while at home.
  • Distinguish between examples of real violence (schoolyard fights, shaking a baby, bullying) and fictional violence (cartoons, world wrestling entertainment, video games) and determine the influence of both on health and well-being.
  • Demonstrate the importance of investigating information for making informed decisions related to healthy foods and physical activity, one’s “inner self”, helpful and harmful substances, healthy family and home, safety at home, and impact of violence.
  • Use the understanding, skills, and confidence related to healthy foods and physical activity, one’s “inner self”, helpful and harmful substances, healthy family and home, safety at home, and impact of violence.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze personal eating practices.
  • Understand the responsibilities associated with the physical, social, spiritual, and emotional changes of puberty.
  • Analyze how infectious diseases (including HIV and Hepatitis C) and non-infectious illnesses/diseases challenge holistic well-being.
  • Analyze the connections between personal identity and personal well-being, and establish strategies to develop and support a positive self-image.
  • Analyze the impact of violence and the cycle of abuse on the holistic well-being of self, family, and community.
  • Assess peer influence and demonstrate a readiness to prevent and/or avoid potentially dangerous situations involving peer pressure (including lying, substance use, and bullying).
  • Assess the importance of self-regulation and taking responsibility for one’s actions.
  • Analyze possible obstacles and envision solutions to addressing health challenges related to personal eating practices, changes of puberty, impact of illness/disease, identity and well-being, violence, peer pressure, and self-regulation.
  • Design and implement, with guidance, two five-day action plans that embrace health opportunities or address health challenges related to personal eating practices, changes of puberty, impact of illness/disease, identity and well-being, violence, peer pressure, and self-regulation.
Physical Education

Goals

  1. To get students understand and practice the basic habits for developing health-related fitness to support personal well-being.
  2. To develop students in exploration and practice a variety of skills, with specific attention to the skills identified in the outcomes.
  3. To develop students a foundation for safe, considerate, and responsible behaviour while participating in movement activities.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Explore, express, and apply, with guidance, a variety of ways to skillfully move the body on the spot, including at a control level of skill when: balancing, jumping on the spot; and progressing-towards-control level of skill when: landing on hands from kneeling position and rotating on the spot.
  • Explore, express, and apply, with guidance, a variety of ways to skillfully move objects, including at a progressing-towards-control level when: throwing (rolling), catching (collecting, gathering) and kicking.
  • Explore and demonstrate rhythmical movement in response to different rhythms (quick, slow, sharp, soft) and dance patterns, using loco-motor skills and non loco-motor skills.
  • Build a repertoire of strategies and skills, with guidance, for and through active participation in a variety of movement activities including: low-organizational games involving travelling (tag games, follow-the-leader, hopscotch, long-rope skipping), target games (ring or hoop toss, bowling, bocce ball) and alternate environment activities and games (hiking, skating, aquatics, cycling, tobogganing, cross-country).
  • Demonstrate, with little or no support, safe and cooperative behaviour while participating in physical education activities.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to:

  • Evaluate the role of participation in movement activities in providing opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, social interaction, increased skill competency, stress reduction, active work life, use of leisure time, contact with nature, and involvement in communities.
  • Express and apply, with guidance, a variety of ways to skillfully move the body through space while participating in movement activities, including at a utilization level of skill when: jumping backward and landing, hopping (body moves on one foot as in right foot to right foot), skipping (combines a step and a hop), leaping (body ‘takes off’ from one foot, propels through air for distance, then lands on the opposite foot), sliding (one footsteps, body propels upward, other foot moves to meet the first foot), galloping (one footsteps, body propels upward, other foot moves to meet the first foot), rolling forward, rolling sideways; control level of skill when: rolling backward.
  • Explore, express, and apply, with guidance, a variety of ways to skillfully move the body on the spot when participating in movement activities, including at a utilization level of skill when: landing on hands from kneeling position, rotating on the spot, control level of skill when: landing on hands from a bent knee standing position.
  • Explore, express, and apply, with guidance, a variety of ways to skillfully move objects while participating in movement activities, including at a: utilization level of skill when: throwing, catching , (collecting, gathering), kicking, control level of skill when: hand dribbling, foot dribbling, striking objects with hands, striking objects with short-handled implements (short-handled racquets, paddles); progressing-towards-control level of skill when: volleying (to send an object in the air before it comes to rest), striking objects with long-handled implements (bats, golf clubs, hockey sticks).
  • Select and use effective movement skills, tactics, and strategies while participating in: low-organizational, inventive, and cooperative games (tag games, relay races, fox and geese, prisoner’s base), small-sided and lead-up target games (bowling, curling, ring or hoop toss, bocce ball) and small-sided and lead-up striking/fielding games (kickball, long ball), small-sided and lead-up invasion/territorial games (two-on-two, three-on-three games using skills from games such as soccer, basketball, touch football), alternate environment activities (hiking, cross-country skiing, orienteering, aquatics, snowshoeing, canoeing, skating, tobogganing, cycling).

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a progression towards control in complex movement skills that combine loco-motor skills with non loco-motor skills to be used in body management activities (including dance and educational gymnastics, and others such as track and field, aquatics, aerobics, skipping, Pilates, yoga) and games.
  • Express and apply, with guidance, a variety of ways to skillfully move objects while participating in movement activities, including at a: utilization level of skill when: volleying (to send an object in the air before it comes to rest), striking with long-handled implements (bats, golf clubs, hockey sticks), control level of skill when: punting.
  • Refine manipulative (sending, receiving, and accompanying objects) skills used in increasingly complex movement activities such as lead-up games, including: throwing, catching (collecting, gathering), kicking, hand dribbling, foot dribbling, striking with hands and short-handled implements (short-handled racquets and paddles).
  • Apply performance cues, movement variables, tactics (body fakes, change of speed, change of direction, keeping the body low while moving), and principles of practice (form, consistency, repetition) in complex movement activities to improve the performance of self and others.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of and willingness to accept the rules of teacher-selected games, including lead-up games, and invented games by officiating and participating in classmate officiated competitions.
  • Make decisions about how to prevent and care for common movement activity-related discomforts and injuries (stiffness, nose bleeds, and sprains).
Art

Goals

  1. Students will investigate the content and aesthetics of the arts within cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and understand the connection between the arts and the human experience.
  2. Students will respond to artistic expressions of SmartKids International School, Cambodian, and International artists using critical thinking, research, creativity, and collaborative inquiry.
  3. Students will inquire, create, and communicate through dance, drama, music, and visual art.

Expected Outcomes of Grade 1 and Grade 2

Students will be able to:

  • Create movements and movement patterns in response to stimuli such as stories, poems, music.
  • Create short dance phrases using the elements of dance including: actions (loco-motor and non loco-motor).
  • Enter into the fiction provided by the drama.
  • Use language, visual images, and other ways (movement, sound effects) to represent ideas.
  • Demonstrate understanding of patterns and the elements of music including: same and different patterns, rhythm (difference between beat and rhythm, sounds and silence, long and short sounds), dynamics (loud and soft), pitch (high and low sounds), texture (sounds heard alone or together) and tone colors (distinguish between).
  • Create art works that express own ideas and explore different forms (painting, drawing, print making) and media (paint, found objects).

Expected Outcomes of Grade 3 and Grade 4

Students will be able to:

  • Contribute ideas when engaged in a variety of drama strategies (role, parallel play, journeys, meetings) and during periods of reflection.
  • Create art works using a variety of visual art concepts (secondary colors), forms (collage, drawing, painting, sculpture, mobile, traditional art), and media (paper, found objects, paint, crayons).
  • Examine arts expressions to determine how ideas for arts expressions may come from artists’ own communities.
  • Use imagination, a variety of drama strategies, and reflection to further the drama’s development.
  • Demonstrate basic skills in use of voice and a variety of sound objects and instruments (traditional and/or homemade) using the environment (natural, constructed, imagined) as inspiration.
  • Create art works using a variety of visual art concepts (contour lines), forms (drawing, sculpture), and media (pencils, pastels, found objects).

Expected Outcomes of Grade 5 and Grade 6

Students will be able to:

  • Express ideas using the elements of dance including: actions (identify basic dance steps such as schottische, polka, grapevine, and step hop), body (body parts leading movements), dynamics (duration, speed, and force continuum), relationships (alone, partner, small groups) and space (asymmetrical and symmetrical shapes, creating and recalling pathways).
  • Contribute ideas, when in and out of role, and further the development of the drama by participating in consensus building, choice of strategies, and selection of dramatic alternatives.
  • Demonstrate increased skills and abilities in the use of voice and instruments (traditional and/or homemade) and develop compositions.
  • Create art works using a variety of visual art concepts (organic shapes), forms (kinetic sculpture, mural), and media (wood, wire, and found objects).
  • Demonstrate how various roles, strategies, and elements (tension, contrast, symbols) function within a drama.
  • Create drama using pop culture as inspiration (pop musicians and movie stars, street theatre, or stories and myths from pop culture).
  • Demonstrate increased skills and abilities in use of the voice and one or more instruments.
  • Create visual art works that express ideas about, and draw inspiration from, pop culture.